Organic semiconductors enable the fabrication of large-scale printed and mechanically flexible electronic applications, and have already successfully established themselves. Since 2016, Facebook has been paying users aged 13 to 35 up to $20 per month, plus referral fees, to sell their privacy by installing the iOS or Android "Facebook Research" app. Facebook even asked users to screenshot their Amazon order history page.




The programme is administered through beta testing services Applause, BetaBound and uTest to cloak Facebook's involvement, and is referred to in some documentation as "Project Atlas" -- a fitting name for Facebook's effort to map new trends and rivals around the globe.on the market for displays in the form of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). In order to break into further market segments, however, improvements in performance are still needed. Doping is the answer. In semiconductor technology, doping refers to the targeted introduction of impurities (also called dopants) into the semiconductor material of an integrated circuit. These dopants function as intentional "disturbances" in the semiconductor that can be used to specifically control the behaviour of the charge carriers and thus the electrical conductivity of the original material. Even the smallest amounts of these can have a very strong influence on electrical conductivity. Molecular doping is an integral part of the majority of commercial test organic electronics applications. Until now, however, an insufficient fundamental physical understanding of the transport mechanisms of charges in doped organic semiconductors has prevented a further increase in conductivity to match the best inorganic semiconductors such as silicon.